As an avid fan of Mad Men, and an elder law attorney, the way the show dealt with one of the character’s senility brought the show right into the present.
Back in the ‘60s, so many women were stay at home mothers. When a parent, or an -in-law started needing more help, it was these wives and mothers who were expected to take care of the parent who needed assistance.
The show didn’t take the easy route. The son, Pete, and his wife had recently split up, a fact the son neglected to tell the rest of his family. Pete, as typical of his character, is dismissive of his mother and tries to pawn her off on his brother, but they knew and insisted he share the responsibility.
So, how is Pete going to handle this? I hope the show continues to deal with it— and I suspect they will. One of the more beloved characters, the ad agencies’ founder, gave a speech at the beginning of the episode that was unfocused—the partner/office manager merely patted him on the back and complimented him.


One Response to “Mad Men Tackles Dementia”

  1. Marylyn

    Have you seen the latest episode? I really am wondering if Pete's mother's dementia would cause her to so VIVIDLY imagine Manolo has satisfied her sexually. Or is it really true? Why would she say such things to Peggy/Trudy?

    Reply

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